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  • Approximately 20% of cats across all ages suffer from painful osteoarthritis in one or more joints. The incidence of osteoarthritis increases with age. Because cats are living longer, it is more likely than ever that every cat owner will face the issue of osteoarthritis at some point.

  • Up to twenty-five of dogs have osteoarthritis. Diet can make a huge impact on the quality of life for dogs with osteoarthritis. Normalizing your pet’s body condition by helping your dog burn fat and preserve or build muscle is an important step in helping improve your pet’s quality of life. Your veterinarian can help you choose the correct nutrient profile for your dog.

  • Osteoarthritis (OA) is a complex condition involving inflammation and degeneration of one or more joints. Cats with OA experience pain and inflammation in various joints that interfere with the activities of daily living.

  • Osteoarthritis (OA) is a complex condition involving inflammation and degeneration of one or more joints.

  • Arthroscopy is a minimally invasive therapy that is used to examine, diagnose, and treat diseases and conditions that affect joints. It requires a specialized piece of equipment called an arthroscope which will allow your veterinarian to look inside the joint using a small fiber optic camera that is hooked up to a monitor. It often requires general anesthesia; however, small incisions in the joint allow for a quicker recovery than traditional methods allow. The recovery time will depend on the extent of the injury, but compared to traditional surgery, recovery time is generally much shorter.

  • Aspergillosis is a fungal infection that commonly causes respiratory disease in pet birds. It can cause both upper (nose, sinuses, eye, and trachea) and lower (lungs and air sacs – a specialized part of the respiratory tract that birds have) respiratory problems or more broadly distributed systemic infections. Aspergillus is normally an environmental contaminant and is not contagious from bird to bird.

  • Certain species of a common fungus called Aspergillus can infect the nasal cavity and sinuses of cats and can even become disseminated to different areas of the body. Cats affected by exposure to this fungus are usually immunosuppressed. Diagnosis of either form, the nasal form or disseminated form, can be difficult, usually requiring X-rays or more advanced imaging such as MRI or CT, as well as tissue biopsies and culture. Treatment of the nasal form involves topical administration of an antifungal agent while the cat is under general anesthesia, although oral antifungals such as itraconazole and posaconazole may also be used. Prognosis is fair to good. Treatment of the disseminated form is more difficult requiring additional antifungals, such as amphotericin b that can be harmful to the kidneys.

  • Certain species of a common fungus called Aspergillus can infect the nasal cavity and sinuses of dogs, and can even become disseminated to different areas of the body. Dogs affected by exposure to this fungus are usually immunosuppressed. Diagnosis of either form, the nasal form or disseminated form can be difficult, usually requiring X-rays or more advanced imaging such as MRI or CT, as well as tissue biopsies and culture. Treatment of the nasal form involves topical administration of an antifungal agent while the dog is under general anesthesia, although oral antifungals such as itraconazole or fluconazole may also be used. Prognosis is fair to good in cases of localized nasal aspergillosis. Treatment of the disseminated form is more difficult requiring additional antifungals, such as amphotericin b; however these can be harmful to the kidneys.

  • Aspirin is given by mouth in the form of a tablet, and is primarily used off label as an anti-clotting medication. It also acts as an anti-inflammatory, pain control, and fever-reducing medication. The most common side effects are gastrointestinal, such as vomiting, decreased appetite, diarrhea, and sometimes bleeding. Do not use aspirin in pets that have bleeding ulcers, bleeding disorders, asthma, pregnancy, or kidney failure. Aspirin should be used very cautiously in cats. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Aspirin is a commonly used over the counter nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and is used to treat fever, pain, inflammation (swelling), and clotting disorders in humans. Aspirin poisoning occurs when a cat ingests a toxic dose of aspirin, either through misuse or accidentally. Clinical signs depend on how much aspirin was eaten. Treatment for aspirin poisoning depends on how quickly the cat is seen by the veterinarian.